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Francatelli, Charles Elmé / A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes
PHILLIPS & COMPY.,

TEA MERCHANTS,

8, KING WILLIAM STREET, CITY, LONDON, E.C.,

Invariably sell

THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

TEAS AND COFFEES IN ENGLAND.

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_A PRICE-CURRENT FREE._

Pure Preserving and other Sugars at Market Prices.

* * * * *

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Teas and Coffees _Carriage Free_ to all England, if to value of 40s.

* * * * *

PHILLIPS AND COMPANY,

TEA MERCHANTS,

KING WILLIAM STREET, CITY, LONDON, E.C.


The Best Food for Children, Invalids, and Others.


ROBINSON'S PATENT BARLEY,

For making superior Barley Water in Fifteen Minutes, has not only
obtained the Patronage of Her Majesty and the Royal Family, but has
become of general use to every class of the community, and is
acknowledged to stand unrivalled as an eminently pure, nutritious, and
light Food for Infants and Invalids; much approved for making a
delicious Custard Pudding, and excellent for thickening Broths or Soups.


ROBINSON'S PATENT GROATS,

For more than thirty years have been held in constant and increasing
public estimation, as the purest farina of the Oat, and as the best and
most valuable preparation for making a pure and delicate GRUEL, which
forms a light and nutritious support for the aged, is a popular recipe
for colds and influenza, is of general use in the sick chamber, and
alternately with the Patent Barley is an excellent Food for Infants and
Children. Prepared only by the Patentees,

ROBINSON, BELLVILLE, AND CO.,
PURVEYORS TO THE QUEEN,
64, RED LION STREET, HOLBORN, LONDON.

* * * * *

EPPS'S COCOA,

(Commonly called Epps's Homoeopathic Cocoa),

IS DISTINGUISHED FOR ITS

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* * * * *

DIRECTIONS FOR USE.

Mix two tea-spoonfuls of the Powder with as much _cold_ Milk as will
form a stiff paste; then add, _all at once_, a sufficient quantity of
_boiling_ Milk, or Milk and Water in equal portions, to fill a breakfast
cup.

* * * * *

_1/4-lb., 1/2-lb., and 1-lb. Packets, at 1s. 6d. per lb._

Sold by Grocers in every part of London, and by Grocers, Confectioners,
and Druggists in the Country.




[Illustration]




A PLAIN

COOKERY BOOK

FOR THE

WORKING CLASSES.


BY

CHARLES ELM FRANCATELLI,

LATE MATRE D'HTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN.
AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" AND "THE COOK'S GUIDE."


NEW EDITION.


LONDON:
ROUTLEDGE, WARNE, AND ROUTLEDGE,
FARRINGDON STREET.




Reprinted from the edition of 1852

Re-issued 1977 by
SCOLAR PRESS
39 Great Russell Street, London WC1

Reprinted 1978

ISBN 0 85967 390 1

Printed in England
by Shenval Press, London and Harlow




INTRODUCTION.


My object in writing this little book is to show you how you may prepare
and cook your daily food, so as to obtain from it the greatest amount of
nourishment at the least possible expense; and thus, by skill and
economy, add, at the same time, to your comfort and to your
comparatively slender means. The Recipes which it contains will afford
sufficient variety, from the simple every-day fare to more tasty dishes
for the birthday, Christmas-day, or other festive occasions.

In order to carry out my instructions properly, a few utensils will be
necessary. Industry, good health, and constant employment, have, in many
instances, I trust, enabled those whom I now address to lay by a little
sum of money. A portion of this will be well spent in the purchase of
the following articles:--A cooking-stove, with an oven at the side, or
placed under the grate, which should be so planned as to admit of the
fire being open or closed at will; by this contrivance much heat and
fuel are economized; there should also be a boiler at the back of the
grate. By this means you would have hot water always ready at hand, the
advantage of which is considerable. Such poor men's cooking-stoves
exist, on a large scale, in all modern-built lodging-houses. Also, a
three-gallon iron pot with a lid to it, a one-gallon saucepan, a
two-quart ditto, a frying-pan, a gridiron, and a strong tin baking-dish.

Here is a list of the cost prices at which the above-named articles, as
well as a few others equally necessary, may be obtained of all
ironmongers:--

_s._ _d._

A cooking-stove, 2 ft. 6 in. wide, with oven only 1 10 0
Ditto, with oven and boiler 1 18 0
A three-gallon oval boiling pot 0 4 6
A one-gallon tin saucepan, and lid 0 2 6
A two-quart ditto 0 1 6
A potato steamer 0 2 0
An oval frying-pan, from 0 0 10
A gridiron, from 0 1 0
A copper for washing or brewing, twelve gallons 1 10 0
A mash-tub, from 0 10 0
Two cooling-tubs (or an old wine or beer cask cut
in halves, would be cheaper, and answer the same
purpose), each 6_s._ 0 12 0
------------
6 12 4
------------

To those of my readers who, from sickness or other hindrance, have not
money in store, I would say, strive to lay by a little of your weekly
wages to purchase these things, that your families may be well fed, and
your homes made comfortable.

And now a few words on baking your own bread. I assure you if you would
adopt this excellent practice, you would not only effect a great saving
in your expenditure, but you would also insure a more substantial and
wholesome kind of food; it would be free from potato, rice, bean or pea
flour, and alum, all of which substances are objectionable in the
composition of bread. The only utensil required for bread-making would
be a tub, or trough, capable of working a bushel or two of flour. This
tub would be useful in brewing, for which you will find in this book
plain and easy directions.

I have pointed out the necessity of procuring these articles for cooking
purposes, and with the injunction to use great care in keeping them
thoroughly clean, I will at once proceed to show you their value in a
course of practical and economical cookery, the soundness and plainness
of which I sincerely hope you will all be enabled to test in your own
homes.




COOKERY BOOK.


No. 1. BOILED BEEF.

This is an economical dinner, especially where there are many mouths to
feed. Buy a few pounds of either salt brisket, thick or thin flank, or
buttock of beef; these pieces are always to be had at a low rate. Let us
suppose you have bought a piece of salt beef for a Sunday's dinner,
weighing about five pounds, at 6-1/2_d._ per pound, that would come to
2_s._ 8-1/2_d._; two pounds of common flour, 4_d._, to be made into suet
pudding or dumplings, and say 8-1/2_d._ for cabbages, parsnips, and
potatoes; altogether 3_s._ 9_d._ This would produce a substantial dinner
for ten persons in family, and would, moreover, as children do not
require much meat when they have pudding, admit of there being enough
left to help out the next day's dinner, with potatoes.


No. 2. HOW TO BOIL BEEF.

Put the beef into your three or four gallon pot, three parts filled with
cold water, and set it on the fire to boil; remove all the scum that
rises to the surface, and then let it boil gently on the hob; when the
meat has boiled an hour and is about half done, add the parsnips in a
net, and at the end of another half hour put in the cabbages, also in a
net. A piece of beef weighing five or six pounds will require about two
hours' gentle boiling to cook it thoroughly. The dumplings may, of
course, be boiled with the beef, etc. I may here observe that the
dumplings and vegetables, with a small quantity of the meat, would be
all-sufficient for the children's meal.


No. 3. ECONOMICAL POT LIQUOR SOUP.

A thrifty housewife will not require that I should tell her to save the
liquor in which the beef has been boiled; I will therefore take it for
granted that the next day she carefully removes the grease, which will
have become set firm on the top of the broth, into her fat pot; this
must be kept to make a pie-crust, or to fry potatoes, or any remains of
vegetables, onions, or fish. The liquor must be tasted, and if it is
found to be too salt, some water must be added to lessen its saltness,
and render it palatable. The pot containing the liquor must then be
placed on the fire to boil, and when the scum rises to the surface it
should be removed with a spoon. While the broth is boiling, put as many
piled-up table-spoonfuls of oatmeal as you have pints of liquor into a
basin; mix this with cold water into a smooth liquid batter, and then
stir it into the boiling soup; season with some pepper and a good pinch
of allspice, and continue stirring the soup with a stick or spoon on the
fire for about twenty minutes; you will then be able to serve out a
plentiful and nourishing meal to a large family at a cost of not more
than the price of the oatmeal.


No. 4. POTATO SOUP FOR SIX PERSONS.

Peel and chop four onions, and put them into a gallon saucepan, with two
ounces of dripping fat, or butter, or a bit of fat bacon; add rather
better than three quarts of water, and set the whole to boil on the fire
for ten minutes; then throw in four pounds of peeled and sliced-up
potatoes, pepper and salt, and with a wooden spoon stir the soup on the
fire for about twenty-five minutes, by which time the potatoes will be
done to a pulp, and the soup ready for dinner or breakfast.


No. 5. PEA SOUP FOR SIX PERSONS.

Cut up two and a-half pounds of pickled pork, or some pork cuttings, or
else the same quantity of scrag end of neck of mutton, or leg of beef,
and put any one of these kinds of meat into a pot with a gallon of
water, three pints of split or dried peas, previously soaked in cold
water over-night, two carrots, four onions, and a head of celery, all
chopped small; season with pepper, but _no_ salt, as the pork, if pork
is used, will season the soup sufficiently; set the whole to boil very
gently for at least three hours, taking care to skim it occasionally,
and do not forget that the peas, etc., must be stirred from the bottom
of the pot now and then; from three to four hours' gentle boiling will
suffice to cook a good mess of this most excellent and satisfying soup.
If fresh meat is used for this purpose, salt must be added to season it.
Dried mint may be strewn over the soup when eaten.


No. 6. ONION SOUP FOR SIX PERSONS.

Chop fine six onions, and fry them in a gallon saucepan with two ounces
of butter or dripping fat, stirring them continuously until they become
of a very light colour; then add six ounces of flour or oatmeal, and
moisten with three quarts of water; season with pepper and salt, and
stir the soup while boiling for twenty minutes, and when done, pour it
out into a pan or bowl containing slices of bread.


No. 7. BROTH MADE FROM BONES FOR SOUP.

Fresh bones are always to be purchased from butchers at about a farthing
per pound; they must be broken up small, and put into a boiling-pot with
a quart of water to every pound of bones; and being placed on the fire,
the broth must be well skimmed, seasoned with pepper and salt, a few
carrots, onions, turnips, celery, and thyme, and boiled very gently for
six hours; it is then to be strained off, and put back into the pot,
with any bits of meat or gristle which may have fallen from the bones
(the bones left are still worth a farthing per pound, and can be sold to
the bone-dealers). Let this broth be thickened with peasemeal or
oatmeal, in the proportion of a large table-spoonful to every pint of
broth, and stirred over the fire while boiling for twenty-five minutes,
by which time the soup will be done. It will be apparent to all good
housewives that, with a little trouble and good management, a savoury
and substantial meal may thus be prepared for a mere trifle.


No. 8. THICK MILK FOR BREAKFAST.

Milk, buttermilk, or even skim-milk, will serve for this purpose. To
every pint of milk, mix a piled-up table-spoonful of flour, and stir the
mixture while boiling on the fire for ten minutes; season with a little
salt, and eat it with bread or a boiled potato. This kind of food is
well adapted for the breakfast of women and children, and is far
preferable to a sloppy mess of tea, which comes to more money.


No. 9. OATMEAL PORRIDGE FOR SIX PERSONS.

To five pints of skim or buttermilk, add a couple of onions chopped
fine, and set them to boil on the fire; meanwhile, mix six
table-spoonfuls of oatmeal with a pint of milk or water very smoothly,
pour it into the boiling milk and onions, and stir the porridge on the
fire for ten minutes; season with salt to taste.


No. 10. OX-CHEEK SOUP.

An ox-cheek is always to be bought cheap; let it be thoroughly washed in
several waters, place it whole in a three gallon boiling-pot filled up
with water, and set it to boil on the fire; skim it well, season with
carrots, turnips, onions, celery, allspice, pepper, and salt; and allow
the whole to boil very gently by the side of the hob for about three
hours and a-half, by which time the ox-cheek, etc., will be done quite
tender; the cheek must then be taken out on to a dish, the meat removed
from the bone, and after being cut up in pieces, put back into the soup
again. Next mix smoothly twelve ounces of flour with a quart of cold
water, pour this into the soup, and stir the whole on the fire, keeping
it boiling for about twenty-five minutes longer; when it will be ready
for dinner. One ox-cheek, properly managed, will, by attending to the
foregoing instructions, furnish an ample quantity of substantial and
nutritious food, equal to the wants of a large family, for three days'
consumption.


No. 11. SHEEP'S-HEAD BROTH.

Get the butcher to split the sheep's head into halves, wash these clean,
and put them into a boiling-pot with two gallons of water; set this on
the fire to boil, skim it well, add carrots, turnips, onions, leeks,
celery, thyme or winter savory, season with pepper and salt; add a pint
of Patna rice, or Scotch barley; and all the whole to keep gently
boiling by the side of the fire for three hours, adding a little water
to make up for the deficiency in quantity occasioned by boiling.


No. 12. COW-HEEL BROTH.

Put a couple of cow-heels into a boiling-pot, with a pound of rice, a
dozen leeks washed free from grit and cut into pieces, and some coarsely
chopped parsley; fill up with six quarts of water, set the whole to boil
on the fire, skim it well, season with thyme, pepper, and salt, and
allow the whole to boil very gently on the hob for about two hours. You
will thus provide a savoury meal at small cost.


No. 13. BACON AND CABBAGE SOUP.

When it happens that you have a dinner consisting of bacon and cabbages,
you invariably throw away the liquor in which they have been boiled, or,
at the best, give it to the pigs, if you possess any; this is wrong, for
it is easy to turn it to a better account for your own use, by paying
attention to the following instructions, viz.:--Put your piece of bacon
on to boil in a pot with two gallons (more or less, according to the
number you have to provide for) of water, when it has boiled up, and has
been well skimmed, add the cabbages, kale, greens, or sprouts, whichever
may be used, well washed and split down, and also some parsnips and
carrots; season with pepper, but _no_ salt, as the bacon will season the
soup sufficiently; and when the whole has boiled together very gently
for about two hours, take up the bacon surrounded with the cabbage,
parsnips, and carrots, leaving a small portion of the vegetables in the
soup, and pour this into a large bowl containing slices of bread; eat
the soup first, and make it a rule that those who eat most soup are
entitled to the largest share of bacon.


No. 14. STEWED LEG OF BEEF.

Four pounds of leg or shin of beef cost about one shilling; cut this
into pieces the size of an egg, and fry them of a brown colour with a
little dripping fat, in a good sized saucepan, then shake in a large
handful of flour, add carrots and onions cut up in pieces the same as
the meat, season with pepper and salt, moisten with water enough to
cover in the whole, stir the stew on the fire till it boils, and then
set it on the hob to continue boiling very gently for about an hour and
a half, and you will then be able to enjoy an excellent dinner.


No. 15. COCKY LEEKY.

I hope that at some odd times you may afford yourselves an old hen or
cock; and when this occurs, this is the way in which I recommend that it
be cooked, viz.:--First pluck, draw, singe off the hairs, and tie the
fowl up in a plump shape; next, put it into a boiling-pot with a gallon
of water, and a pound of Patna rice, a dozen leeks cut in pieces, some
peppercorns and salt to season; boil the whole very gently for three
hours, and divide the fowl to be eaten with the soup, which will prove
not only nourishing but invigorating to the system.


No. 16. ROAST FOWL AND GRAVY.

Let us hope that at Christmas, or some other festive season, you may
have to dress a fowl or turkey for your dinner. On such occasions I
would recommend the following method:--First, draw the fowl, reserving
the gizzard and liver to be tucked under the wings; truss the fowl with
skewers, and tie it to the end of a skein of worsted, which is to be
fastened to a nail stuck in the chimney-piece, so that the fowl may
dangle rather close to the fire, in order to roast it. Baste the fowl,
while it is being roasted, with butter, or some kind of grease, and when
nearly done, sprinkle it with a little flour and salt, and allow the
fowl to attain a bright yellow-brown colour before you take it up. Then
place it on its dish, and pour some brown gravy over it.


No. 17. THIS IS THE BROWN GRAVY FOR THE FOWL.

Chop up an onion, and fry it with a sprig of thyme and a bit of butter,
and when it is brown, add a good tea-spoonful of moist sugar and a drop
of water, and boil all together on the fire until the water is reduced,
and the sugar begins to bake of a dark brown colour. It must then be
stirred on the fire for three minutes longer; after which moisten it
with half-a-pint of water, add a little pepper and salt; boil all
together for five minutes, and strain the gravy over the fowl, etc.


No. 18. BREAD SAUCE FOR A ROAST FOWL.

Chop a small onion or shalot fine, and boil it in a pint of milk for
five minutes; then add about ten ounces of crumb of bread, a bit of
butter, pepper and salt to season; stir the whole on the fire for ten
minutes, and eat this bread sauce with roast fowl or turkey.


No. 19. EGG SAUCE FOR ROAST FOWLS, ETC.

Boil two or three eggs for about eight minutes; remove the shells, cut
up each egg into about ten pieces of equal size, and put them into some
butter-sauce made as follows:--viz., Knead two ounces of flour with one
ounce and-a-half of butter; add half-a-pint of water, pepper and salt to
season, and stir the sauce on the fire until it begins to boil; then mix
in the pieces of chopped hard-boiled eggs.


No. 20. PORK CHOPS, GRILLED OR BROILED.

Score the rind of each chop by cutting through the rind at distances of
half-an-inch apart; season the chops with pepper and salt, and place
them on a clean gridiron over a clear fire to broil; the chops must be
turned over every two minutes until they are done; this will take about
fifteen minutes. The chops are then to be eaten plain, or, if
convenient, with brown gravy, made as shown in No. 17.


No. 21. SHARP SAUCE FOR BROILED MEATS.

Chop fine an onion and a pennyworth of mixed pickles; put these into a
saucepan with half-a-gill of vinegar, a tea-spoonful of mustard, a small
bit of butter, a large table-spoonful of bread-raspings, and pepper and
salt to season; boil all together on the fire for at least six minutes;
then add a gill of water, and allow the sauce to boil again for ten
minutes longer. This sauce will give an appetizing relish to the
coarsest meats or fish when broiled or fried, and also when you are
intending to make any cold meat into a hash or stew. In the latter case,
the quantity of water and raspings must be doubled.


No. 22. ROAST VEAL, STUFFED.

A piece of the shoulder, breast, or chump-end of the loin of veal, is
the cheapest part for you, and whichever of these pieces you may happen
to buy, should be seasoned with the following stuffing:--To eight ounces
of bruised crumb of bread add four ounces of chopped suet, shalot,
thyme, marjoram, and winter savory, all chopped fine; two eggs, pepper
and salt to season; mix all these ingredients into a firm compact kind
of paste, and use this stuffing to fill a hole or pocket which you will
have cut with a knife in some part of the piece of veal, taking care to
fasten it in with a skewer. If you intend roasting the veal, and should
not possess what is called a bottle-jack, nor even a Dutch oven, in that
case the veal should be suspended by, and fastened to, the end of a
twisted skein of worsted, made fast at the upper end by tying it to a
large nail driven into the centre of the mantelpiece for that purpose.
This contrivance will enable you to roast the veal by dangling it before
your fire; the exact time for cooking it must depend upon its weight. A
piece of veal weighing four pounds would require rather more than an
hour to cook it thoroughly before your small fire.


No. 23. VEAL CUTLETS AND BACON.

You may sometimes have a chance to purchase a few trimmings or cuttings
of veal, or a small piece from the chump end of the loin, which you can
cut up in thin slices, and after seasoning them with pepper and salt,
and rolling them in flour, they are to be fried in the fat that remains
from some slices of bacon which you shall have previously fried; and,
after placing the fried veal and bacon in its dish, shake a
table-spoonful of flour in the frying-pan; add a few drops of ketchup or
vinegar and a gill of water; stir all together on the fire to boil for
five minutes, and pour this sauce over the cutlets. A dish of cutlets of
any kind of meat may be prepared as above.


No. 24. A PUDDING MADE OF SMALL BIRDS.

Industrious and intelligent boys who live in the country, are mostly
well up in the cunning art of catching small birds at odd times during
the winter months. So, my young friends, when you have been so fortunate
as to succeed in making a good catch of a couple of dozen of birds, you
must first pluck them free from feathers, cut off their heads and claws,
and pick out their gizzards from their sides with the point of a small
knife, and then hand the birds over to your mother, who, by following
these instructions, will prepare a famous pudding for your dinner or
supper. First, fry the birds whole with a little butter, shalot,
parsley, thyme, and winter savory, all chopped small, pepper and salt to
season; and when the birds are half done, shake in a small handful of
flour, add rather better than a gill of water, stir the whole on the
fire while boiling for ten minutes, and when the stew of birds is nearly
cold, pour it all into a good-sized pudding basin, which has been
ready-lined with either a suet and flour crust, or else a
dripping-crust, cover the pudding in with a piece of the paste, and
either bake or boil it for about an hour and-a-half.


No. 25. BAKED PIG'S HEAD.

Split the pig's head into halves, sprinkle them with pepper and salt,
and lay them with the rind part uppermost upon a bed of sliced onions in
a baking dish. Next bruise eight ounces of stale bread-crumb, and mix it
with four ounces of chopped suet, twelve sage leaves chopped fine,
pepper and salt to season, and sprinkle this seasoning all over the
surface of the pig's head; add one ounce of butter and a gill of vinegar
to the onions, and bake the whole for about an hour and-a-half, basting
the pig's head occasionally with the liquor.


No. 26. BAKED GOOSE.

Pluck and pick out all the stubble feathers thoroughly clean, draw the
goose, cut off the head and neck, and also the feet and wings, which
must be scalded to enable you to remove the pinion feathers from the
wings and the rough skin from the feet; split and scrape the inside of
the gizzard, and carefully cut out the gall from the liver. These
giblets well stewed, as shown in No. 62, will serve to make a pie for
another day's dinner. Next stuff the goose in manner following,
viz.:--First put six potatoes to bake in the oven, or even in a Dutch
oven; and, while they are being baked, chop six onions with four apples
and twelve sage leaves, and fry these in a saucepan with two ounces of
butter, pepper and salt; when the whole is slightly fried, mix it with
the pulp of the six baked potatoes, and use this very nice stuffing to
fill the inside of the goose. The goose being stuffed, place it upon an
iron trivet in a baking dish containing peeled potatoes and a few
apples; add half-a-pint of water, pepper and salt, shake some flour over
the goose, and bake it for about an hour and a-half.


No. 27. BAKED SUCKING PIG.

Let the pig be stuffed in the same manner as directed for a goose, as
shown in the preceding Number; score it all over crosswise, rub some
grease or butter upon it, place it upon a trivet in a dish containing
peeled potatoes and a few sliced onions, season with pepper and salt;
add half-a-pint of water, and bake the pig for about two hours, basting
it frequently with its own dripping, or, a bit of butter tied up in a
piece of muslin.


No. 28. BAKED OR ROAST DUCKS.

These are to be dressed in the same way as directed for dressing geese.


No. 29. HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF A PIG, AFTER IT IS KILLED.

Cottagers sometimes feed a pig for their own consumption, and,
therefore, in the hope that many of you may have it in your power to do
so, I will give you proper instructions as to the best way to make the
most of it. First, when the pig is killed, should the hair or bristles
be wet, wipe them dry with a wisp of hay or straw, and having laid it on
the ground upon a narrow bed of dry straw three inches in thickness, and
laid some loose straw all over it, set fire to it, and as the upper
straw burns out, lay on another covering of loose straw, and, by the
time this has burnt out, all the hairs of the upper part of the pig will
probably be singed off, if not, burn a little more straw upon the
remaining parts; and, on turning the pig over, should it be found that
any of the hairs yet remain, let them be singed off with a lighted wisp
of straw. Throw a pail of water over the pig, and scrape it clean and
dry with an old knife. The next thing to be done, is to insert a stout
stick, pointed at the ends, into the hocks of the hind legs; fasten a
strong cord to the stick, and hoist up the pig so as to enable you to
stand up and finish your work with ease to yourself. With a sharp knife
rip up the belly, and stretch out the flaps with two sticks to enable
you to throw in some water to cleanse the pig's inside, having first
removed the guts, etc.; hang up the pluck to cool, and also the
chitterlings, and loose fat; and, after thoroughly wiping the pig, let
it hang in the draught to become quite cold. You then split the pig in
halves, commencing between the hind quarters; and, when this is done,
first cut off the hocks, then the hams, and the head; next cleverly
remove, slicing away, what is called the spare-rib--that is, the lean
meat about the ribs--reaching up about four inches toward the breast
part, and lay the spare-ribs aside to be sold or reserved for your own
use. The head may be baked as shown in No. 25. The spare-rib may be
dressed as in No. 27.


No. 30. HOW TO CURE HAMS.

To six pounds of common salt, add four ounces of saltpetre, eight ounces
of treacle, two ounces of salprunella, winter savory, bay-leaves, thyme,
marjoram, and a good table-spoonful of allspice, bruise all these things
well together, and thoroughly rub them over and into the hams, _with
very clean hands_. The rubbing-in must be repeated four or five
successive mornings, and the hams must remain in this pickle for ten
days longer.


No. 31. HOW TO SMOKE HAMS.

When the hams have been well pickled, as shown in the preceding Number,
they must be pressed between boards with heavy stones to render them
flat; the hams should remain in press for twenty-four hours; and, at the
end of that time, must be well rubbed all over with peasemeal mixed with
a little salt; they are then to be smoked in a close shed or in the
chimney, burning for that purpose some branches of juniper or any other
wood, and some sawdust. The smoking must last five days. The hams, when
sufficiently smoked, must be kept in a cool place. They will not be ripe
for cooking before six months after their curing. Remember that a couple
of well-cured hams, kept in reserve for a case of need, will always
prove a ready means to realize some twenty-five shillings towards paying
the rent, etc.


No. 32. HOW TO CURE BACON.

Mind that your pickling-trough is well scalded out before using it for
pickling the bacon. Allow at the rate of four ounces of salt to every
pound of meat, and to every ten pounds of salt six ounces of saltpetre,
two ounces of salprunella, and eight ounces of sugar; rub the salt,
etc., well into the bacon every morning for twelve successive days; and
at the end of that time, let the sides of bacon be pressed between
boards with heavy stones placed upon them to keep them flat; and at the
end of twenty-four hours, rub them over with peasemeal in which there
has been mixed a little salt, and smoke the bacon in the same manner as
the hams; and thus, by timely thriftiness, you will be provided with a
meat dinner for a long while.


No. 33. HOW TO DISPOSE OF THE PIG'S PLUCK.

See Nos. 72 and 73.


No. 34. HOW TO MAKE PORK SAUSAGES.

Take equal parts of fat and lean meat, such as the inferior end of the
spare-ribs and some of the loose fat; chop these well together, adding a
few sage leaves, a little thyme, pepper and salt, and one or two eggs;
when the whole is thoroughly mixed and chopped fine, use a sprinkle of
flour on a table or dresser, for the purpose of rolling the sausages
into shape of the size and form of a man's thumb. These sausages may be
fried in the ordinary way.


No. 35. BLACK PUDDINGS.

When a pig is killed, the blood should be caught in a pan, and a little
salt must be stirred in with it while yet warm, to prevent its
coagulation or thickening. This will serve to make you some hog's
puddings, excellent things in their way, and for the preparation of
which you must attend to the following instructions, viz.:--To every
pound of blood, add eight ounces of fat cut up in small squares, two
ounces of rice or grits, boiled quite soft in milk; season with pepper
and salt, chopped sage, thyme, and winter savory, and some chopped
onions boiled soft in a little milk or water; mix all these things well
together, and use a tin funnel for filling in the cleansed guts with the
preparation, taking care to tie the one end of each piece of gut with
string, to prevent waste. The puddings being thus prepared, tie them in
links, each pudding measuring about six inches in length, and when all
are tied, let them be dropped into a pot containing boiling-water, just
taken off the fire, and allow them to remain in this until they become
set, or slightly firm; the puddings must then be carefully lifted out,
and hung to a nail driven into the wall, to drain them from all excess
of moisture; and before they are fried or broiled, they must be slightly
scored with a sharp knife, to prevent them from bursting while they are
being cooked.


No. 36. HOW TO MELT DOWN THE SEAM, OR LOOSE FAT.

Cut up the seam in small pieces, put it into a pot with about a gill of
water, and set it over a slow fire to melt down, stirring it frequently
with a spoon to prevent it from burning; and as soon as all is melted,
let it be strained off into a jar for use. This will produce what is
called lard, and will serve for making lard cakes, pie or pudding
crusts, and also for general cooking purposes, instead of butter, etc.


No. 37. ITALIAN CHEESE.

This is prepared by chopping up the whole of the pig's pluck, the
chitterlings, and a couple of pounds of the fat; mix this in a pan with
seasoning composed of chopped sage, thyme, winter savory, allspice,
pepper, and salt, and with it fill earthen pots or jars having lids to
them; bake the contents in moderate heat; or if you have no oven of your
own, send them to the baker's. A jar containing two pounds would require
about an hour and three-quarters' baking. Italian cheese is to be eaten
cold, spread upon bread.


No. 38. PIG'S FEET.

These are to be well salted for about four days, and then boiled in
plenty of water for about three hours; they may be eaten either hot or
cold.


No. 39. CURRIED RICE.

Boil one or more pounds of rice, as directed in No. 92, and drain all
the water from it; slice some onions very thin, and fry them brown with
a little butter; then add the boiled rice, a spoonful of curry-powder,
and a little salt to season; mix all together. This is excellent with
boiled or fried fish.


No. 40. A PLAIN RICE PUDDING.

To every quart of milk add six ounces of rice, one ounce of brown sugar,
a pinch of allspice, and ditto of salt; put all these in a proper sized
pie-dish, with one ounce of butter, and set the pudding to bake for one
hour and-a-half. When the pudding has been in the oven half an hour,
stir it round with a fork.


No. 41. A GROUND RICE PUDDING.

Ingredients, eight ounces of ground rice, three pints of skim milk, one
ounce of butter, four ounces of sugar, a pinch of allspice or bit of
lemon-peel, a pinch of salt, and two or three eggs; mix all the above
ingredients (except the eggs) in a saucepan, and stir them on the fire
till the batter boils; then beat up the eggs with a fork in a basin, and
mix them well into the rice batter, and pour the whole into a
well-greased pie-dish, and bake the pudding for an hour.


No. 42. A BREAD PUDDING FOR A FAMILY.

Ingredients, a two-pound loaf, two quarts of milk, two ounces of butter,
four ounces of sugar, four ounces of plums or currants, three eggs, a
piece of lemon-peel chopped, and a spoonful of salt. Divide the loaf
into four equal-sized pieces, and soak them in boiling-water for twenty
minutes, then squeeze out the water, and put the bread into a saucepan
with the milk, butter, sugar, lemon-peel, and salt, and stir all
together on the fire till it boils; next add the beaten eggs and the
currants; pour the pudding into a proper sized greased baking-dish, and
bake it for an hour and a-quarter.


No. 43. A BATTER AND FRUIT PUDDING.

Ingredients, two quarts of milk, one pound of flour, four eggs, eight
ounces of sugar, one quart of fruit (either plums, gooseberries,
currants, &c.), one ounce of butter, a good pinch of salt. First, mix
the flour, eggs, sugar, salt, and a pint of the milk, by working all
together in a basin or pan, with a spoon, and when quite smooth, add the
remainder of the milk; work the batter thoroughly, and pour it into a
large pie-dish, greased with the butter; add the fruit, and bake the
pudding for an hour and a-quarter.


No. 44. A TREACLE PUDDING.

Ingredients, two pounds of flour, twelve ounces of treacle, six ounces
of suet or dripping fat, a quarter of an ounce of baking-powder, a pinch
of allspice, a little salt, one pint of milk, or water. Mix the whole of
the above-named ingredients in a pan, into a firm compact paste; tie it
up in a well-greased and floured pudding-cloth; boil the pudding for at
least two hours and a-half, and when done, cut it in slices, and pour a
little sweetened melted butter over it.


No. 45. APPLE PUDDING.

Ingredients, one pound and a-half of flour, six ounces of suet chopped
fine, two pounds of peeled apples, four ounces of sugar, a little salt,
and three gills of water. Mix the flour, suet, and salt with three
quarters of a pint of water into a firm paste; roll this out with flour
shaken over the table, using a rolling-pin to roll it out; and line a
greased cloth, which you have spread in a hollow form within a large
basin, with the rolled-out paste; fill up the hollow part of the paste
with the peeled apples, gather up the sides of the paste in a
purse-like form, and twist them firmly together; tie up the pudding in
the cloth, boil it in plenty of boiling water for two hours, and when it
is turned out of the cloth on to its dish, cut out a round piece from
the top, and stir in the sugar.


No. 46. RICE AND APPLES.

Ingredients, one pound of rice, twelve apples, two ounces of sugar. Tie
up the rice very loose in a pudding-cloth, so as to admit that while
boiling it may have sufficient room to swell out to five times its
original quantity. While the rice is boiling, which will take about one
hour, peel the apples, and put them in a saucepan with nearly
half-a-pint of water, a bit of butter, lemon-peel, and the sugar, and
stew them on the fire till dissolved, stirring them while boiling for a
few minutes. When your rice pudding is done and turned out on its dish,
pour the apple-sauce over it. This cheap kind of rice pudding may also
be eaten with all kinds of fruits, prepared in the same manner as herein
directed for apples.


No. 47. BROWN AND POLSON PUDDING.

Ingredients, six ounces of Brown and Polson's prepared Indian corn, two
quarts of milk, two ounces of sugar, a bit of cinnamon or lemon-peel, a
pinch of salt, three eggs. Mix all the above ingredients (except the
eggs) in a saucepan, and stir them on the fire till they come to a boil;
then add the eggs beat up; mix thoroughly, pour the batter into a
pie-dish greased with butter, and bake the pudding for one hour. Brown
and Polson's prepared Indian corn is a most excellent and economical
article of food, equal to arrow-root, and will prove, on trial, to be
both substantial and nutritive, and also easy of digestion to the most
delicate stomachs.


No. 48. BROWN AND POLSON FRUIT PUDDING.

Prepare the pudding batter as indicated in the foregoing Number, and
when you have poured one-half of it into the greased pie-dish, strew
about two pounds of any kind of fruit upon this, such as gooseberries,
currants, plums, cherries, etc., and then pour the remainder of the
batter all over the fruit. Bake the pudding an hour and a quarter.
Peeled apples or pears may be used for the same purpose.


No. 49. BROWN AND POLSON THICK MILK.

Ingredients, three ounces of Brown and Polson's prepared Indian corn,
one quart of milk, one ounce of sugar, a bit of cinnamon, a pinch of
salt. Mix all the above-named ingredients together in a saucepan, and
stir them constantly while boiling on the fire for ten minutes. This
thick milk is most excellent for children's breakfast or supper, and
would be found both cheaper and better for their health than a sloppy
mess of tea.


No.



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